Turandot

Giacomo Puccini (1858 – 1924)

23
Friday
June
19:30 - 22:30
C-Prices: € 100,00 / € 82,00 / € 58,00 / € 34,00 / € 24,00
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Information about the work

Dramma lyrico in three acts
Libretto by Giuseppe Adami and Renato Simoni,
after the play by Carlo Gozzi
First performed on 25th April 1929 in Milan
Premiered at the Deutsche Oper Berlin on 13th September 2008

Recommended from 15 years on

2 hrs 45 mins / 1 interval

In Italien with German and English surtitles

Pre-performance lecture (in German): 45 minutes prior to each performance

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The Children’s Chorus is ponsored by Dobolino e.V. [the support association for the Children’s Chorus of the Deutsche Oper Berlin] and Berliner Volksbank

23
Friday
June
19:30 - 22:30
C-Prices: € 100,00 / € 82,00 / € 58,00 / € 34,00 / € 24,00
Buy tickets
the content

Society lives in terror of a Princess. Turandot, the fascinating and beautiful representative of a ruling dynasty, presides over the cruelty. Matrimony alone seems likely to end the violence, yet no suitor has managed to solve her riddles and win her hand. Time and again the same scene is played out, ending in yet another execution. Against all expectations, Calaf, son of an exiled potentate from a far-off country, breaks the mould. He answers her questions and crowns his triumph by turning the tables, extending the game of riddles and asking the Princess a question in return.

In his early sixties Puccini is still keen to break new ground. Society is in a state of flux, huge changes are sweeping the art world, fresh and more abstract forms are asserting themselves as a way of expressing the world as we know it. Puccini spent the last four years of his life working on TURANDOT, basing his opera on Carlo Gozzi's fairytale play of 1762. Far from conjuring up an endearing, doll-like China, the exotic tones of this, his richest and most dissonant score, present us with a world steeped in an atmosphere of inconceivable cruelty.

The resolution of the drama was to prove an insurmountable obstacle for Puccini. Although he was uneasy at the prospect of any opera of his ending happily he never extricated himself from the cul de sac into which he had manoeuvred himself with the selfless death of Liu and the imminent coming together of Turandot and Calaf. The question as to what might possibly draw these two characters together remained unanswered. The notion of an all-encompassing love as an instrument of redemption that overcomes all obstacles so fascinated and repelled Puccini that he found himself unable to capture this Utopia for the stage. When he died in 1924 with the work unfinished, the publishing house of Ricordi commissioned the composer Franco Alfano to complete the opera in line with sketches left behind by Puccini.

“There exists a form of violence that is bent on destroying the body, not as a result of, or companion to, another type of violence, but purely as a deliberate act directed against that particular body. I call this form of violence “autotelian”. Our Western literature begins with the description of an excessive use of autotelian violence: Achilles is not content with killing Hector; he wants to destroy his body. In building the Colosseum, one of the most famous edifices on earth, Rome was erecting a structure dedicated to the public delight in spectacles of autotelian violence.

In our modern rush to revile the connection between might and violence we have forgotten how to recognise it when we see it. In our eyes violence is committed either illegitimately [crime] or legitimately [for the prevention of crime] or as an act of war designed to disarm a threatening enemy. Rapacious violence is either criminalised or, in wartime, denied; it is no longer tolerated, even within families. At best, we perceive autotelian violence as a peculiar form of madness, to be abhorred when encountered in the real world and loathed when viewed in the media.

Where autotelian violence determines government policy it passes beyond our understanding and we do not see it happening. Humans have this ability; it is the greatest power that can be invested in a person, to visit wanton violence on other people. And if we ignore the fact that humans have always been, at the very least, susceptible to the temptation to commit acts of autotelian violence, then we are liable not to see the risks inherent in perpetrating violence in whatever form. Wherever spaces are created for the perpetration of autotelian violence, autotelian violence will be perpetrated.” (Jan Philipp Reemtsma)

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Newsletter

28
NOV

On 1 December, it's that time again. Our already traditional Advent calendar welcomes you with free admission. Members of the Deutsche Oper Berlin ensembles look forward to shortening the days until Christmas Eve with personalised musical programmes in which you will hear Christmas classics as well as absolute rarities, perhaps never heard before. Just come by and experience our artists up close.

Our Advent Foyer Programme
Enjoy our chamber concerts from Monday to Friday, from 5.00 p.m. to approx. 5.25 p.m., in the rank foyer on the right. Should there be any deviations in the venue or time, you will find a note in the overview. Admission is free.


1 December 2022 | 5.00 p.m. | Rank foyer on the right
Dietmar Schwarz reads "The Snow Queen"

2 December 2022 | 5.00 p.m. | Parquet Foyer
The Little Chorus of the Children's Chorus sings Christmas carols

5 December 2022 | 5.00 p.m. | Rank foyer on the right
Old Russian Romances with Maria Motolygina

6 December 2022 | 5.00 p.m. | Parquet Foyer
Father Christmas comes to visit - together with Elisa Verzier

7 December 2022 | 5.00 p.m. | Parquet Foyer
"Ding Dong! Merrily on High" - A concert with the VoiceChangers

8 December 2022 | 5.00 p.m. | Rank foyer on the right
Chamber music with members of the orchestra

9 December 2022 | 5.00 p.m. | Rank foyer on the right
"Beyond the Snow Queen" - Songs by Samuel Penderbayne and others
with Alexandra Ionis, Attilio Glaser and Henriette Zahn

12 December 2022 | 5.00 p.m. | Rank foyer on the right
Songs and Arias with Sua Jo and Kyle Miller

13 December 2022 | 5.00 p.m. | Rank foyer on the right
Daniel Nicholson sings and presents

14 December 2022 | 5.00 p.m. | Rank foyer on the right
Ralph Vaughan Williams' "The House of Life"
with Dean Murphy and Elda Laro

15 December 2022 | 5.00 p.m. | Rank foyer on the right
"Four Hands" - Piano Music
with John Parr and Christopher White

16 December 2022 | 5.00 p.m. | Tischlerei
South American Songs with Jorge Puerta

19 December 2022 | 5.00 p.m. | Tischlerei
English and Polish Songs
with Maire Therese Carmack, Artur Garbas and Manon Gerhardt

20 December 2022 | 5.00 p.m. | Rank foyer on the right
"Christmas Carols for Two Tenors”
with Kieran Carrel and Thomas Cilluffo

21 December 2022 | 5.00 p.m. | Parquet Foyer
Christmas caroling together with the brass band

22 December 2022 | 5.00 p.m. | Rank foyer on the right
"L'ange et l'enfant" - On the occasion of César Franck's 200th birthday
with Andrea Schwarzbach and Christian Zacker

23 December 2022 | 4.00 p.m. | Rank foyer on the right
Brahms songs with Arianna Manganello
Please note the earlier start: 4.00 p.m.


All further information in the respective daily door on our homepage

Raffles at the weekends
Because an Advent calendar is of course also filled at weekends and on Christmas Eve, you will find online raffles on our homepage on Saturdays and Sundays as well as on 24 December. We would like to take this opportunity to thank cooperation partners such as NAXOS and the Yorck cinema group.